1-800-683-8362 505-275-2121 7601 Montgomery NE Albuquerque, NM 87109

Area Rug Construction

TEMA Contemporary Furniture offers a variety of area rugs constructed from different materials and patterns. Your area rug should perform well in addition to looking great. To find the best area rug within your budget, consider the right combination of density, twist and fiber.

Density refers to the tightness of the tufts, or knots. The denser the weave, the better the area rug will wear.

Twist

refers to the amount of yarn spirals. A yarn twist that is tighter provides added durability.

Fiber

for area rugs may be from a variety of synthetic or natural materials, which will help determine performance and appearance. Natural fibers provide soft, low luster colors and long-term performance. Synthetic fibers provide brilliant colors, softness, easy maintenance and value.

Area rugs may be machine-made, hand-hooked, hand-tufted, hand-knotted, a flat weave or braided.

Hand-Made Area Rugs

In addition to traditional hand-made area rugs, Asia and other countries also produce many hand-made contemporary area rugs. There are different types of hand-made area rugs: knotted, tufted, hooked, looped and flat weave. Rug construction alone does not dictate area rug quality, factors such as density, material and weave should also be considered when selecting an area rug.

Hand-Knotted Area Rugs

Hand knotted area rugs are woven by hand; and depending on size, construction and density, one area rug could take a year or more to complete. Hand-knotted area rugs are secured to the foundation by knotting, versus gluing, producing exceptional density and quality.

Hand-Hooked Area Rugs

Using a pattern and a hooking device, yarn is punched through a canvas cloth creating a looped pile. The yarns are then glued in place in lieu of knotting, and a cloth is attached to the back.

Hand-Tufted Area Rugs

Hand-tufted area rugs are usually created by punching yarn in a cloth that is attached to a frame, and then gluing the backs with latex after hooking the yarn. The surface loop pile is then sheared to produce a flat surface. This process creates an area rug that is very plush, generally less expensive and easier to make than hand-knotted area rugs.

Flat Weave Area Rugs


Flat weave area rugs are less expensive, easier to make and are usually made of wool, cotton, bamboo, or nylon. Because they are looped, flat weave area rugs do not have a pile and are reversible. This category also includes Kilims, Dhurries and Soumaks.

Braided Area Rugs

Braided area rugs are constructed in several different ways, including tape, tubular, yarn and flat. In the tradition of early America from which braided area rugs were created, these area rugs may be woven with many different materials such as wool, clothing, old blankets, nylon and blends.

 

Machine-Made Area Rugs

These area rugs are made on power looms by hand, machine or computer. The loom is strung with a cotton or jute warp, and then woven using nylon, polypropylene, wool or other material. Computer operated machines produce a number of contemporary designs in various sizes and colors from a predetermined design. More than 40 shades can be achieved in a single area rug using a cross-weaving technique. Machine-made area rugs have become very popular due to the variety of sizes, colors, designs, lower pricing and availability. Machine-made area rugs are woven on Wilton, side-woven Wilton and Gripper Axminster looms.

Wilton Woven

Wilton looms are situated face-to-face and feature computerized electronic heads. The loom needles loop the yarns in two synthetic backings. Loom size and structure vary based on number of color capacities. Two identical area rugs emerge from the loom once the weaving process is complete and the rug is cut in half.

Wilton Side Woven

The Wilton side-woven area rugs are woven in a similar fashion, but at a 90 degree angle to the above area rugs. On occasion, cotton backing is to give these area rugs a softer feel.

Axminster


Axminster more commonly refers to a type of carpet rather than a type of loom, although the Gripper Axminster loom was created to mass produce carpet in 1927.